Kihnu, Estonia

{Versione italiana disponibile qui sotto!}

P_20180709_114622_PN.jpg
The first thing I notice about Kihnu is how tiny the island is.
My guide Mare is nowhere to be seen when I step off the early morning ferry. I stay around as all the other (very few) tourists and the one taxi serving Kihnu leave the harbour, then ask around. I only have to wonder about my next step for 10 minutes before a stranger walks up to me to say Mare is coming soon; another 5 minutes, and I climb into Olavi, Mare’s husband’s, car. In 15 minutes flat, the grapevine has led me to her house.

Did you know the Estonian coast is crowded with islets? I didn’t, until a fateful flight from Helsinki to Milan. As soon as I read about Kihnu – one of the smallest of such islands – I decided I had to see it for myself. It was, by far, one of the best trips of the last few years. Every single Estonian I’ve met, be it in London or Tallinn (which I’ve visited briefly afterwards) asked me Why? Why visit Kihnu?

IMG_8727m3.jpg

Why visit Kihnu
How and when to visit Kihnu
What to do in Kihnu
Where to stay and eat in Kihnu

Why visit Kihnu

Kihnu (the H sounding like a Scottish ch) is a small island with a population of a few hundred people in the Gulf of Riga. It was declared Intangible Cultural Heritage by Unesco in 2008. Its relatively remote location has preserved the island’s culture and heritage to this day: Kihnu women wear their traditional, colourful, handmade skirts in their daily life. You can see them in their red attire and scarf, going about their daily duties, anywhere on the island: one of the unique features of Kihnu consists in the freedom its women have always had. They’ve governed the island for their husbands, who historically have been away for months at a time, working as seamen and fishermen.

Kihnu’s society has been called a matriarchy, though that is not completely appropriate: societal expectations and limitations for women are not foreign to this small island. However, when I asked Mare if Kihnu women enjoyed more freedom than in the rest of the country, she hesitated and confirmed that – both in the present and the past – women on the island did have more freedom, that they had held local government roles at a time when it would have been out of the question elsewhere.

In Kihnu however, as in many other places, girls were told not to be idle, to keep their hands occupied sewing and embroidering, even when walking somewhere. The walk to church was the only time when their hands could rest. If anything, Kihnu women wore two hats – those of head of the home and of local government. No wonder Estonian island women have a reputation for being strong, as D., a friend from Tallinn, told me.

Today, Kihnu is threatened by two dangers: one is depopulation caused by unemployment (this year, only 35 children will attend the local school); the other is hunting, which Mare sadly admitted is practiced increasingly by Italian tourists on hunting holiday packages, and which is killing off Kihnu’s wildlife.

If you end up in Kihnu, I would absolutely recommend you wander around on your own (rent a bike at the shop near the harbour; 10 EUR/day); but also get in touch with Mare and have her tell you about her special little island. She is from Kihnu via one parent, Olavi’s 100% a Kihnu islander; they both know the island like the palm of their hand. Except for the funny mishap upon my arrival, Mare has been nothing short of wonderful, and she can organise anything you want. I was lucky enough to join a group of elderly Japanese tourists and their guide/translator, Mika; they were absolute sports being loaded onto an open truck and happily attacked their dried fish with chopsticks at lunch, chatting with me and asking me for photos of my hometown.

Joining them also allowed me to attend a small singing and dancing show (because well, heritage is very much alive in Kihnu, but the islanders don’t regularly break off dancing on Tuesday afternoons). One of the special facts about Kihnu is that women often dance with one another, as their men are at sea (or drunk. Their words, not mine!)

Girls in Kihnu learn the songs of the islands in school, as well as how to play the fiddle and accordion, the local dialect (which is full of words of Germanic origin and has more of a sing-song intonation) and how to make the typical skirts (which contain more red strips for younger girls, while older women, whose mourning and brides wear darker stripes – the last, to signify their sadness at leaving their childhood home). Every women owns about 20.

IMG_8707m0

IMG_8730m1

IMG_8741m2

P_20180710_140323_vHDR_Auto.jpg

How and when to go to Kihnu

(Bear with me – I’m going to go into some details here as the Baltic countriew Lonely Planet guide is not exactly up to date on this).
Getting to Kihnu is not hard per se, but it may take some planning.


The first thing you need to do is getting yourself to Pärnu, a city on the southern coast of Estonia that you can reach by bus or train (about 10 EUR, 2h30). If you’re planning on going to Pärnu directly after landing in Tallinn, you can walk to Tallinn coach station or bussijamm in about 25 minutes. I recommend you use Lux Express to get to Pärnu – the buses are super comfy, you can plug in your phone, and they have wifi and aircon.

From Pärnu, the next step is taking a local bus to Munalaid, a small harbour about an hour out of town (1 EUR), and a ferry to Kihnu from there (1 hour, 4 EUR, you can take your car). You can check bus times on tpilet.ee or on peatus.ee for local buses; ferry times are available on Veeteed. As a general rule, buses from Pärnu to Munalaid arrive just on time to allow you to board the ferry (and similarly, they wait for the ferry to dock before making their way back to Pärnu). So don’t worry about being late. Local bus tickets can be purchased from the driver.
Ferry tickets can be purchased at the harbour or online for the same price; I had no idea whether there’d be a crowd, so I bought mine online. Just go to “E-tickets (Tallinn – Aegna)” (or “Piletite eelmüük”… the English version of the website is pretty bad. Don’t go to “Booking – Online Timetable” or you’ll be sent back to the timetable page).

Capture2
Bus times from Pärnu to Munalaid. Select “Munalaiu” for Munalaid; “Munalaiu sadam” (sadam = harbour) is the same place but for some reason the search will return fewer results
Capture
Ferry times – did I say the English version of the website could be improved? Days are Mon to Sun, and the columns are for leaving from Kihnu and from Pärnu respectively.

If you’re lucky enough to be planning to travel from Pärnu to Kihnu on a Wednesday, there’s a direct ferry leaving at 12.45 pm from Pärnu (and at 9.45 am from Kihnu): just the one, which takes about 2 hours (6 EUR). Other than that, going through Munalaid is your only option.
These are the timetables for summer 2018, so do check the websites for any updates.

A question I asked myself is whether it’d be worth to travel to Kihnu in the winter. I was there in July and it was a wonderful 20 degree (Celsius) temperature. I suspect that you’d run into an obstacle in the winter months though: according to Mare, in the winter the population drops from the 700 registered residents to about 300-400 people (among other reasons, students have to attend school on the mainland starting from around age 10). This also means there are no restaurants or cafes open in the winter – none, nada. So you either arrange your meals with your accommodation, or you’re in trouble. Kihnu doesn’t see more than a couple snowstorms a year, but I would not really be eager to try that pleasant breeze in December… (sauna in the winter is Kihnu, on the other hand, must be heaven).

If you’re interested in visiting Kihnu during the Sea Festival, as 2,000 people do yearly, remember it takes place in the first week of July. I was more interested in seeing everyday Kihnu. If you go, do book well in advance!

What to do in Kihnu

There’s plenty to do even without a guide. First of all you should, by all means, visit the lighthouse (3 EUR fee), on the southernmost part of Kihnu, which reopened its doors a couple years ago – thanks to Mare’s effort.

P_20180709_115632_PN

Kihnu Museum is small and adorable. Right at the centre of the island, it sits next to the school, community centre, and small library. It’s been refurbished recently thanks to EU funding and it contains a lot of information and items describing the local heritage (fishing, weddings, schooling), important people from the island, and handicrafts.

P_20180709_130410_vHDR_Auto.jpg

IMG_8718m1.jpg

The little church of Kihnu is just opposite; just like the population, it turned Orthodox in the nineteenth century. A priest comes from the mainland about once a month to celebrate mass, baptisms, and weddings.

P_20180710_193217_vHDR_Auto.jpg

P_20180710_111813_vHDR_Auto.jpg

Kihnu also boasts some beautiful beaches, ideal for bathing and picnics, especially in the northern bit of the island (where you can admire both sunrises and sunsets) and in the west.

P_20180709_145934_vHDR_Auto.jpg

Where to sleep and eat in Kihnu

Kihnu does not have any proper hotels; rather you have a choice of camping / bungalows or homestays. Mare has a few single and twin rooms at her farm, in the proximity of the lighthouse, and in a separate farm next to the harbour (30 EUR / night / person).

Other than that, there’s some information on options online, but the best list of accommodation options is this leaflet, which I only found on the ferry and that I am generously sharing here:

P_20180711_065805_vHDR_Auto.jpg

44667499_304283936833784_3435081772092620800_n.jpg

As for eating: Kihnu isn’t the best foodie destination. I asked Mare what kind of vegetables were grown on the island, and she said All of them! Carrots, potatoes, and cabbage. So I can guarantee you that any meal serves at any of the 3 places that serve food on the island will include beef or pork, carrots, potatoes, and cabbage. However, everything was really good, and obviously local.

Mind the opening hours: after 8 pm, you’ll struggle to find food. One of the three places (Aru Grill, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond) I never actually saw open except for one random afternoon! The two cafes were I was able to get a meal are:
Rock City (Nõmme-Lennujaam, Lemsi, 88002 Pärnu maakond), north east part of Kihnu, not too far from the harbour; this is also a camping / hostel.
Kurase Bar (Kurase, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond)

Two stores complete the businesses on the island; they stock all sorts of stuff, from cleaning supplies to grilling equipment. I saw very little food that didn’t come tinned, so I expect locals grow their own food or get it fresh from the mainland. You can still get the essentials for a quick meal.
Kihnu Pood (Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond, Estonia) (this place actually has a few lonely tomatoes, sitting behind the counter with luxury items such as vodka and chocolate…)
Kurase Store (Kurase, Sääre küla, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond, Estonia).

Edited to add: The New York Times and the Guardian both ran articles about Kihnu after I published this post:
Where women rule: the last matriarchy in Europe – in pictures (The Guardian)
‘I photographed 35 women, 10 are still alive’: tragedy of the Isle of Women (The Guardian)
Welcome to Estonia’s Isle of Women (The New York Times)

IMG_8658.jpg

—————————–

P_20180709_114622_PN.jpg

La mia prima impressione di Kihnu e’ di quanto l’isola sia minuscola.
Scendo dal traghetto, ma la mia guida, Mare, non si vede da nessuna parte. Rimango fino a quando tutti gli altri (pochi) viaggiatori e l’unico taxi di Kihnu non hanno lasciato il porto, poi chiedo chiedo di lei. Ho solo 10 minuti per chiedermi cosa fare; poi uno sconosciuto dice che Mare arrivera’ a momenti; dopo altri 5, salgo in macchina con Olavi, suo marito. In 15 minuti, il passaparola mi ha portata a casa sua.

Sapevate che la costa estone e’ piena di isolette? Io no, l’ho scoperto su un volo da Helsinki a Milano; e appena ho letto di Kihnu, una delle piu’ piccole, ho deciso che dovevo andarci.
E’ stato uno dei viaggi piu’ belli degli ultimi anni. Ogni Estone che ho incontrato – a Londra, o a Tallinn, dove sono stata per un giorno prima di tornare – mi ha chiesto, Perché? Perché vai a Kihnu?

IMG_8727m3.jpg

Perché andare a Kihnu
Come e quando andare a Kihnu
Cosa fare a Kihnu
Dove alloggiare e mangiare a Kihnu

Perché andare a Kihnu

Kihnu (con l’H pronunciata come una C toscana) e’ un’isoletta di poche centinaia abitanti nel Golfo di Riga, dichiarata Patrimonio Intangibile dell’Umanita’ dall’Unesco nel 2008. La sua posizione relativamente remota ha permesso alla cultura e alle tradizioni dell’isola di sopravvivere fino a oggi: nella vita quotidiana, le donne di Kihnu indossano le tipiche gonne colorate intessute con le loro mani. Fazzoletto in testa e vestito rosso, le potete vedere ovunque a Kihnu, occupate in ogni genere di attivitá: una delle caratteristiche uniche di Kihnu e’ di essere un posto in cui le donne hanno sempre goduto di grande liberta’. Hanno governato l’isola in assenza dei mariti, che storicamente sono sempre stati marinai e pescatori, e assenti dall’isola per parecchi mesi alla volta.

Il sistema sociale di Kihnu viene persino chiamato una matriarchia; in realta’ non e’ cosí semplice; anche su questa piccola isola ci sono e ci sono state costrizioni sociali. Ma quando ho chiesto a Mare se a Kihnu le donne fossero piu’ libere che nel resto dell’Estonia, ci ha pensato e mi ha detto che sí, lo erano e lo erano state, ed avevano coperto incarichi di governo locale quando era impensabile altrove.

Anche a Kihnu come quasi ovunque alle bambine si diceva che non dovevano mai stare con le mani in mano: per evitare di essere oziose, le avevano sempre occupate a tessere e cucire, persino negli spostamenti a piedi. Solo il tragitto per andare a messa era esente dalla regola. Semmai, le donne di Kihnu avevano e hanno doppie incombenze – occuparsi della casa e della politica locale. Per fortuna, come mi raccontava D., un’amica di Tallinn, le isolane hanno la reputazione di essere fortissime.

Oggi, Kihnu e’ minacciata da due fattori: lo spopolament dovuto alle scarse opportunita’ di lavoro (quest’anno solo 35 bambini frequenteranno le scuole sull’isola) e la caccia, che amaramente Mare mi ha detto essere praticata soprattutto da Italiani in gita organizzata che sterminano la fauna dell’isola con fucili ad alta precisione.

Se capitate a Kihnu, il mio consiglio spassionato e’ quello di fare qualche giro in solitaria (vicino al porto si affittano bici per 10 euro al giorno) ma anche di contattare Mare e farvi raccontare di quanto sia speciale la sua piccola isola. Lei ha sangue mezzo isolano, Olavi e’ al 100% di Kihnu: conoscono quest’isola come le loro tasche. A parte la disorganizzazione del primo giorno, quando mi sono ritrovata da sola al porto, Mare e’ stata meravigliosa, e riesce a organizzare qualsiasi cosa vogliate. Io ho avuto la fortuna di unirmi a un tour che aveva organizzato per un gruppo di vecchietti giapponesi e la loro traduttrice Mika, che sono stati caricati su un camion aperto e non hanno fatto una piega di fronte al pesce essiccato estone, ma hanno attaccato il pesce essiccato a forza di bacchette portate da casa, chiacchierando e chiedendomi di mostrargli foto del posto da cui vengo.

Questo mi ha permesso anche di assistere a un concerto di canti e danze locali in onore degli ospiti (perché le tradizioni sono sopravvissute ma non e’ che a Kihnu si mettano a ballare per strada spontaneamente il martedí pomeriggio). Una delle caratteristiche di Kihnu e’ il fatto che le donne danzino fra di loro, proprio perché gli uomini sono spesso per mare (…o ubriachi, hanno aggiunto loro).
Le bambine e ragazze di Kihnu a scuola imparano i canti dell’isola, e a suonare il violino o la fisarmonica, il dialetto locale (con piu’ parole di origine germanica rispetto all’estone, e piu’ cantilenante) e come fare le gonne (piu’ rosse per le giovani, piu’ scure per momenti di lutto, o per i matrimoni, per indicare la tristezza nel lasciare la casa dei genitori). Ogni donna ne possiede circa 20, e le donne sposate ci mettono sopra un grembiule.

IMG_8707m0

IMG_8730m1

IMG_8741m2

P_20180710_140323_vHDR_Auto.jpg

Come e quando andare a Kihnu

(Occhio, su questo la guida della Lonely Planet non e’ aggiornata – quindi mi dilungo un po’.)
Arrivare a Kihnu non e’ difficile, ma richiede un po’ di preparazione.


La prima tappa e’ arrivare a Pärnu, una cittadina sulla costa sud del Paese che potete raggiungere tramite bus o treno, da Tallinn (circa 10 euro per un viaggio di 2h30). (Se come me avete intenzione di raggiungere Pärnu appena atterrati a Tallinn, potete raggiungere la stazione dei bus o bussijamm a piedi: si trova a meta’ strada tra aeroporto e centro cittá, circa 25 minuti di camminata). Vi consiglio caldamente i bus della Lux Express, che sono comodi e hanno prese, wifi e aria condizionata; ho provato anche un’altra compagnia locale, ma i sedili sono strettissimi.
Da Pärnu, la cosa migliore e’ prendere il bus per Munalaid, un porticciolo sperduto circa un’ora fuori cittá (1 EUR), e da lí un traghetto per Kihnu (un’ora, 4 EUR, caricano anche auto). Per i bus potete controllare gli orari su tpilet.ee o meglio, per brevi distanze, su peatus.ee; per i traghetti, su Veeteed. In generale, i bus partono da Pärnu giusto in tempo per prendere il traghetto (e viceversa aspettano il traghetto per ripartire alla volta di Pärnu), quindi non preoccupatevi per i ritardi. I biglietti di questi bus locali si comprano dall’autista.
Il biglietto del traghetto si puo’ comprare sul posto o online per lo stesso prezzo; non avendo idea di quanta folla avrei trovato, io l’ho comprato in anticipo sul sito: basta andare su “E-tickets (Tallinn – Aegna)” (oppure “Piletite eelmüük”… la versione inglese del sito spesso fa cilecca. Non cliccate su “Booking – Online Timetable” o vi riporta alla pagina degli orari).

Capture2
Orari del bus da Pärnu a Munalaid. Cercate “Munalaiu” per Munalaid; c’e’ anche l’opzione “Munalaiu sadam” (porto) che e’ la stessa cosa, ma vi dá meno risultati
Capture
Orari del traghetto – l’ho detto che la versione inglese non funziona bene? I giorni sono da lunedí a domenica, e le colonne “partenze da Kihnu” e “partenza da Pärnu”.

Se avete la fortuna di volervi spostare da Pärnu a Kihnu di mercoledi, c’e’ anche un traghetto diretto: uno alla settimana, che parte alle 12.45 da Pärnu e alle 9.45 da Kihnu e ci mette poco piu’ di due ore (6 EUR).

(Questi sono gli orari per l’estate 2018: e’ una buona idea tenere d’occhio i siti in caso di cambiamenti.)
Una delle domande che mi sono fatta quando ero lí e’ stata: Varrebbe la pena andare a Kihnu in inverno? Io ci sono stata a meta’ luglio, e stavo benissimo (circa 20 gradi C). Credo pero’ che piu’ che le temperature, i rischi siano altri: secondo Mare, in inverno la popolazione crolla (i 700 residenti registrati ci sono solo in estate; in inverno non ci sono piu’ di 300-400 persone sull’isola, anche per l’assenza di scuole sopra il grado elementare), e non ci sono caffé o ristoranti aperti. Zero. Zilch. Quindi, o vi organizzate con il campeggio o la persona che vi ospita, oppure nada. E per quanto non nevichi piu’ di un paio di volte ogni anno, sono sicura che quel venticello che mi sono goduta io possa essere letale, a dicembre. (Per contro, la sauna in quella stagione deve essere piacevole!)

Se invece siete interessati a vedere Kihnu durante il Festival del Mare, che attrae circa 2000 persone ogni anno, si tiene la prima settimana di luglio, e ci sono concerti, danze e attivitá. A me interessava di piu’ vedere la Kihnu di tutti i giorni, ma sono certa che il festival sia interessante. Se ci andate, prenotate molto in anticipo!

Cosa fare a Kihnu

Ci sono diverse cose che potete fare anche senza una guida. Al primo posto c’e’, assolutamente, il faro di Kihnu (ingresso 3 EUR), sulla punta sud dell’isola, che ha riaperto i battenti un paio di anni fa grazie anche agli sforzi di Mare.

P_20180709_115632_PN

Il piccolo Kihnu Museum e’ adorabile. Si trova al centro dell’isola, insieme al centro incontri, alla scuola e alla piccola biblioteca dell’isola. E’ stato risistemato di recente grazie a dei fondi della comunita’ Europea e contiene oggetti e informazioni sulle tradizioni di Kihnu (pesca, matrimoni, scuola), personaggi importanti del luogo, e artigianato.

P_20180709_130410_vHDR_Auto.jpg

IMG_8718m1.jpg

Di fronte al museo si trova la chiesetta di Kihnu, che insieme agli abitanti dell’isola e’ passata dal luteranesimo alla religione ortodossa nell’Ottocento. Un prete viene dalla terraferma circa una volta al mese a celebrare messa, battesimi e matrimoni.

P_20180710_193217_vHDR_Auto.jpg

P_20180710_111813_vHDR_Auto.jpg

A Kihnu ci sono anche delle piccole, bellissime spiagge per fare bagni e picnic, soprattutto a nord (dove potete ammirare sia l’alba che il tramonto) e a ovest.

P_20180709_145934_vHDR_Auto.jpg

Dove alloggiare e mangiare a Kihnu

A Kihnu non ci sono dei veri e propri hotel, ma ci sono un paio di campeggi con bungalow e diversi locali si sono organizzati per aprire le proprie porte ai visitatori e trasformare le proprie case in guesthouse. Mare ha diverse stanze doppie e triple nella sua fattoria, vicino al faro, e in un’altra fattoria vicina al porto (30 EUR / notte / pp).

La fonte migliore di informazioni che ho trovato e’ un libretto informativo che si trova solo sul traghetto, e che condivido generosamente qui sotto:

P_20180711_065805_vHDR_Auto.jpg

44667499_304283936833784_3435081772092620800_n.jpg

Per quanto riguarda i pasti… Kihnu non e’ esattamente una destinazione da foodie. Ho chiesto a Mare se coltivassero verdure sull’isola, e mi ha risposto: Certo! Coltiviamo tutto: carote, patate, e cavoli. Quindi potete stare sicuri che in qualunque dei tre posti dove potete farvi servire del cibo a Kihnu (tre, non scherzo), vi offriranno varie combinazioni di carne di manzo, patate, carote, e cavolo. Pero’ era tutto molto buono, e a chilometro zero.

Attenzione agli orari: dopo le 20.00 e’ molto difficile trovare uno dei tre posti aperti. Anzi, uno (Aru Grill, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond) l’ho trovato sempre chiuso eccetto per un pomeriggio!
I due caffé dove sono riuscita a mangiare sono:
Rock City (Nõmme-Lennujaam, Lemsi, 88002 Pärnu maakond), nel nord est dell’isola, non troppo lontano dal porto; e’ anche un campeggio / ostello.
Kurase Bar (Kurase, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond)

Ci sono anche due negozietti in cui hanno di tutto, dai prodotti per la pulizia alla carbonella (e sono anche gli unici due negozi dell’isola), ma ho visto quasi solo cibo in scatola; credo che per lo piu’ il cibo fresco venga coltivato o allevato sul posto, o acquistato sulla terraferma. Qualcosina per prepararvi un pasto veloce, peró, potete trovarlo.
Kihnu Pood (Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond, Estonia) (in questo in realta’ ho visto qualche pomodoro, tenuto dietro al bancone, a prova di furto, insieme alla vodka…)
Kurase Store (Kurase, Sääre küla, Sääre, 88005 Pärnu maakond, Estonia).

IMG_8658.jpg

Aggiunta del marzo 2020: sia il New York Times che il Guardian hanno pubblicato articoli su Kihnu di recente:
Where women rule: the last matriarchy in Europe – in pictures (The Guardian)
‘I photographed 35 women, 10 are still alive’: tragedy of the Isle of Women (The Guardian)
Welcome to Estonia’s Isle of Women (The New York Times)

3 thoughts on “Kihnu, Estonia

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s