Uzhhorod, not really Ukraine

Uzhhorod (11)

{Versione italiana disponibile qui sotto!}

Skip to practical info

I doze off on the bus from Slovakia and wake up at the last town before the border with Ukraine, to the ticket vendor lady shouting at a man, Kamarat, do you have a passport, yes, or no?
Minutes later, after he gets kicked off the bus, a handful of blue passports and two burgundy ones are handed over to the Slovakian border guard. The other burgundy passport belongs to Alberto, a Spaniard who lives in London and with whom by that time I am chatting in Italian, with Svitlana, who’s worked in Italy for a few months, moderating the conversation for the other passengers. Having two foreigners on the bus is exhilarating, and everybody wants us to know that they’ve been to Spain once, or that they drive to Italy with their lorry sometimes, or demonstrate that they can dance “like they dance in Spain” (that would be the feisty ticket lady). Svitlana has fairly dark memories of her times in Italy, and says she has come back to Ukraine because Io, non schiava (I am not a slave). She’s also a librarian by training and breaks my heart when she tells me that in Uzhhorod, you earn about 130 euros a month with that job – if you can find one. People make fun of us for trying to speak Russian to them – teach us Ukrainian instead: we are at the very margin of the country, the corner furthest from Russia.

Uzhhorod (8)

***

I meet Péter at the entrance to the Hungarian church. It’s half an hour before Sunday mass and when I say I am a turistka, no one objects to me having a look. When I leave, saying beautiful, kharashi, spasiba, a voice follows me asking where I am from, in English.
Péter belongs to the Hungarian minority of Uzhhorod. Hungarians have a long history in Transcarpathia – in fact, they were its first rulers after arriving in the 10th century. He is a nuclear physician in Uzhhorod, where he was born and raised, and is shocked to find an Italian tourist with a British accent in his city. (I get the impression they don’t get many foreign tourists, or many Italian ones at least). He asks me if I am enjoying Uzhhorod, I tell him that I am really enjoying it – that it’s my first time in Ukraine and I am in love already. He laughs and says Oh, in Uzhhorod, you’re not really in Ukraine yet.
(Then he asks the pastor if he can show me the church library, and he responds something in Hungarian along the lines of The library on a Sunday, young man? That is preposterous.)

***

And yet Uzhhorod is not Europe, either. Dasha and Vitaliy are in my same kupe (second class) compartment on the night train to Kiev, and they are courteous enough to only laugh a little at me for not knowing how to get water out of the tap in the toilet, or where the duvets are, or that you can only have your chai bez malaka (tea with no milk) on the train. They laugh harder, delighted, when I ask them for coffee shop recommendations in Russian.
Dasha asks me why I moved to London and I tell her that there are no jobs in Italy in my sector. But it’s Europe, she protests, Europe clearly an entity very much separate from the Ukrainian countryside out of our window.

***

Ukrainians are kind people, with a big heart, who easily turn a frown into a smile. The lady at the covered market telling me off for taking photographs changes attitude completely when upon further investigation she discovers that I do not work for the gazeta (newspaper). The babushka at the local art museum is mad at me for taking photos with my camera (telefon only, lady) but then brightens up when I ask her gde eta (where is this) about a painting of autumn landscape. She starts happily bossing me around, telling me which artwork I have to take a photo of (her favourites, mostly portraits of young girls in Ukrainian costumes) and describing stuff to me.
I am slightly hesitant to approach Irina, who sells flowers on the pedestrian bridge in Uzhhorod. I imagine she must be tired from the work and the rain; Ukrainians clearly love flowers – there are another half a dozen flower sellers around, and flower shops everywhere – but business must be slow in this weather. But when I ask her if I can take a photo, she smiles at me, and she breaks into even an larger smile when I walk closer to talk, ask her name, whether she is from here.
When it starts raining again, she urges me to go back to my hotel, get warm, not stay out in the cold. She keeps smiling at me until I’m out of sight.

***

Uzhhorod (18)

Uzhhorod (14)

Uzhhorod (5)

Uzhhorod is “other” for both worlds on its sides. Ruled by Hungarians, then by an Italian family for centuries, then under Austro-Hungarian and Soviet rule, this Transcarpathian area is dotted with small castles. It has multiple catholic churches, a small Hungarian one, a synagogue-turned-concert-hall, and a stunning Orthodox cathedral that broadcast hymns across the city well into the afternoon on Sunday. The museums (regional history in the castle, and the art history one) focus on local history and art. Like many other small liminal cities, Uzhhorod has found its own identity to hang on to.

***

Practical information

How to get to Uzhhorod

The airport in Uzhhorod has been closed for about 15 years, but reaching the city by bus or train is relatively easy. Ryanair and Wizzair both fly into Košice, in Slovakia, only a couple hours bus ride (plus passport check) away from Uzhhorod (beware – there is also a Košice in Czechia and Google Maps can get confused). There are 3 or 4 busses a day, normally costing around 7 EUR.

Uzhhorod is also connected to Kiev by night trains (and day trains, of course) taking around 12 to 15 hours. Tickets start from around 10 GBP and can sell out fast (and I mean same-day fast) once reservations open. The same trains stop in Lviv. My train did not have a platzkart (3rd class).

Note: for some reason platform 1 in Uzhhorod is marked platform 2. Yes, confusing. However, not all that many trains go through Uzhhorod – so you’ll be fine. The train and bus station sit on opposite sides of a square in the south of Uzhhorod.

When to go to Uzhhorod

I slightly failed at this: late April and early May is supposed to be the absolute best time to see Uzhhorod due to its prodigious sakura blossoms. However, they were basically gone by the first weekend in May, when I visited. You can see how stunning it normally looks here.

Uzhhorod (10)

Where to stay in Uzhhorod

Alina hotel and hostel (Fedyntsya St, 25, Uzhhorod) was amazing.

Where to eat in Uzhhorod

Stuff your face with khinkali at Khinkalnya (Fedyntsya St, 12А, Uzhhorod). In general, avoid the restaurants along the riverside (where they do speak English but they’ll rip you off and you’ll eat mediocre food) and pick small restaurants in the covered galleries.

—————————–

Uzhhorod (11)

Salta direttamente alle informazioni pratiche

Mi sveglio sul bus dalla Slovacchia all’Ucraina, dalle parti dell’ultimo paese prima del confine: la controllora sta urlando a un passeggero, Kamarat, ce l’hai un passaporto, sí o no?
Qualche minuto dopo porgiamo una pila di passaporti blu (e due rossi) alla guardia di confine (il kamarat, non avendone né blu né rossi, è rimasto a bordo strada). L’altro passaporto rosso è di Alberto, spagnolo di Londra; chiacchieriamo in italiano con la moderazione pubblica di Svitlana, che ha lavorato un po’ in Italia e fa da interprete agli altri passeggeri. Con due stranieri sul bus si fa caciara – lo sappiamo che una volta sono stati in Spagna, che guidano il camion fino in Italia a volte, o che “sanno ballare come in Spagna”? (La controllora, ovviamente). Svitlana ha ricordi piuttosto cupi dell’Italia, ed è tornata perché Io, non schiava. È anche lei bibliotecaria, e mi si stringe il cuore quando mi dice che un lavoro da bibliotecaria, in Ucraina, paga 130 euro al mese – se lo trovi. Ci sfottono perché cerchiamo di parlare russo, sostituiscono i nostri tentativi con l’ucraino. Siamo nell’angolo più periferico del Paese, il piú lontano dalla Russia.

Uzhhorod (8)

***

Incontro Péter davanti alla chiesa ungherese di Uzhhorod. Manca mezz’ora alla messa, quindi sta bene a tutti che la turistka dia un’occhiata in giro. Quando me ne vado, dicendo beautiful, kharashi, spasiba, mi insegue una voce che mi chiede di dove sono, in inglese.
Péter fa parte della comunitá ungherese della città, che ha una lunga tradizione nell’area; gli Ungheresi sono stati tra i primi a detenere il potere in questa parte dei Carpazi. Di mestiere fa il fisico nucleare, qui a Uzhhorod dove é nato e cresciuto, e continua a guardarmi di sottecchi, trovando divertentissima questa Italiana con un accento inglese che si aggira per la sua città. Mi chiede se Uzhhorod mi piace: gli dico che mi ha già stregata, che é la mia prima volta in Ucraina e sono giá innamorata. Ride e mi risponde che Qui, non sei ancora in Ucraina – non a Uzhhorod.
(Poi chiede al parroco se mi può mostrare la biblioteca della parrocchia, e il parroco baffuto strabuzza gli occhi e dice qualcosa in ungherese che somiglia molto a Sei matto, giovanotto? La biblioteca di domenica?)

***

D’altro canto Uzhhorod non e’ nemmeno Europa. Dasha e Vitaliy sono nel mio stesso scompartimento di kupe (seconda classe) sul treno notturno per Kiev, e sono abbastanza gentili da ridere solo sotto i baffi quando mi devono spiegare come aprire l’acqua, dove stanno le coperte per freddolosi, e che il chai (tè) si puo’ prendere solo bez malaka (senza latte) su questo treno tutto sgarruppato. Ridono di più quando mi ricordo come chiedere un suggerimento per un buon coffee shop in città in russo.
Quando dico a Dasha che mi sono trasferita a Londra perché nella cultura in Italia si trova poco lavoro, mi guarda con sospetto e protesta che Ma e in Europa! L’Europa chiaramente un’entitá del tutto separata dalla campagna ucraina che scorre fuori dal finestrino.

***

Gli Ucraini sono gentili, hanno il cuore tenero e passano volentieri al sorriso. La signora al mercato coperto che mi ha sgridata perché facevo foto si addolcisce quando scopre che non lavoro per la gazeta (il giornale); la babushka al museo d’arte mi insegue per dirmi di non fare foto con la macchina fotografica (solo telefon!) ma si illumina quando le chiedo gde eta (dov’è) una scena autunnale in un dipinto. Allora comincia a guidarmi per le sale, dandomi istruzioni sulle foto che devo fare, tutti i suoi quadri preferiti, soprattutto ritratti di ragazze in abiti tradizionali, descrivendo tutto nei dettagli in un monologo di cui non capisco una parola.
Esito un po’ a parlare a Irina, che vende fiori sul ponte pedonale di Uzhhorod. Mi immagino sia stanca – è tardi, piove da tutto il giorno – e per quanto agli Ucraini piacciano i fiori (ci sono negozi e banchetti ovunque), gli affari devono essere cosí cosí, oggi. Ma quando le chiedo se le posso fare una foto, Irina non solo acconsente, ma mi sorride, e ancora di più quando mi metto a parlarle, le chiedo come si chiama, se è di qui. Quando ricomincia a piovere, mi scaccia sempre col sorriso, dicendo che non devo prendere freddo, e non smette di sorridere e salutare fino a che non esce dalla mia visuale.

***

Uzhhorod (18)

Uzhhorod (14)

Uzhhorod (5)

Uzhhorod è “cosa altra” da una parte e dall’altra. Sotto controllo ungherese, poi di una famiglia italiana, poi austro-ungarico, poi sovietico, questo pezzetto di Carpazi è costellato di piccoli castelli. Ha chiese cattoliche, ungheresi, una sinagoga che ora è sala concerti, una cattedrale ortodossa che dentro è come uno scrigno e trasmette inni per chilometri per la maggior parte della domenica. I musei (il museo del castello e quello di arte) parlano di storia locale. Come altre piccole città di confine, Uzhhorod ha un’identità tutta sua.

***

Informazioni pratiche

Come arrivare a Uzhhorod

L’aeroporto di Uzhhorod è chiuso da 15 anni, ma ci si arriva piuttosto comodamente in treno o bus. Ryanair e Wizzair hanno entrambe voli per Košice, in Slovacchia, poi in due ore (piu’ una terza per i controlli alla frontiera) di bus si arriva a Uzhhorod (occhio: c’è una Košice anche Cechia e Google Maps si confonde). Ci sono 3 o 4 bus al giorno, e il biglietto costa 7 euro.

Uzhhorod da Kiev si raggiunge col treno (notturno o diurno) in circa 12-15 ore. I biglietti costano dai 12 euro in su e in alcuni periodi bisogna prenderli il prima possibile (anche lo stesso giorno). Il mio treno non aveva una platzkart (terza classe). Lo stesso treno passa anche da Lviv. Sui treni ucraini ha scritto tanto Eleonora (Pain de Route), che ne sa molto piú di me!

NB: per qualche ragione il binario 1 di Uzzhorod è segnato come binario 2 in stazione. Ci sono solo tre binari e non moltissimi treni, quindi in ogni caso difficile salire su quello sbagliato. La stazione dei treni e quella dei bus sono ai due angoli della stessa piazza, nel sud di Uzhhorod.

Quando andare a Uzhhorod

Un pelo prima di quando sono andata io: a fine aprile la città si copre di fiori di ciliegio. Il primo weekend di maggio rimaneva poco, ma potete vedere qui che aspetto ha la citta’ in piena fioritura.

Uzhhorod (10)

Dove alloggiare a Uzhhorod

Alina hotel and hostel (Fedyntsya St, 25, Uzhhorod), senz’altro.

Dove mangiare a Uzhhorod

Riempitevi di khinkali da Khinkalnya (Fedyntsya St, 12А, Uzhhorod). In generale, evitate i ristoranti sul lungofiume, che non vedono l’ora di pelarvi per del cibo mediocre, e infilatevi in uno dei ristorantini nelle strade coperte.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s