Muhu & Saaremaa, Estonia

{Versione italiana disponibile qui sotto!}

Sooner or later, I had to see it: the Baltic Sea, in its winter, white glory that I love so much. This time I ventured further north than Kihnu, to Muhu e Saaremaa, the largest of the Estonian islands and thought to possibly be the Ultima Thule.

Muhu (3)

Saaremaa and Muhu, nested together but profoundly different: Muhu is fully vested in its identity as an island. The manager of the farm where I spent the night (more on this below) has been living in Muhu for years and is married to a Muhu-born man, but she candidly admitted she’ll never be considered a local. Her husband has basically lost that right too, by studying and living in Tallinn for a few years; Muhu only counts those who never abandon it among its own.
Saaremaa is different: the largest island in Estonia, it also has what is basically the only real city amongst them, Kuressaare. Saaremaa people feel islanders – and they are – but the tones are much more playful, as exemplified by the game of tug of war played by Saaremaa and the island further north, Hiiumaa, a few years back (if you’re wondering, no one won – the rope broke). Saaremaa is a popular summer and winter destination among Estonians, due to the large presence of spas and saunas, but a foreigner is still considered a bizarre sight in January especially if she’s not Russian.

Both islands are easily reached from Tallinn via a direct bus that takes about 3 hours to Muhu (Liiva) and 4 in total to Saaremaa (Kuressaare). The bus gets loaded onto a ferry so you don’t have to worry about changes, but remember you can’t spend the half-hour ferry journey on the bus. The ferry is large and modern and has a bar and restaurant in addition to loos and a lounge area. A bridge between the mainland and Muhu has been discussed for years but it has its opposition, especially on the island. Muhu and Saaremaa are connected by a land bridge.

Muhu

If driving through Muhu without leaving the main road, you might think there’s little to see on the island except for the town of Liiva.

Muhu (1).jpg

And you must stop in Liiva, if nothing else to see its 13th-century gothic church of St Catherine (Katariina kirik), white and graceful on a field burned by frost, surrounded by black trees. The polychrome mural paintings inside, influenced by the Byzantine tradition, are stunning.

Muhu

Yet, Muhu comes to life in the fishermen’s villages off the main road, behind the pine forests, in its farms with bright green doors and the old flour mills. Koguva, in the north west, is the most interesting of such villages: its local museum (Muhu Museum) is as amazing as I’ve found similar institutions in Estonia to be. It is based in three historical buildings, which include a farm and a museum. And remember the bright red skirts women wear in Kihnu? Muhu has similarly beautiful skirts in shades of orange and yellow, and is world-famous for its sophisticated embroidery traditions (especially blankets and shoes).

Muhu_embroidery.jpg

Even though I ended up loving it in its own right, visiting Muhu came as a natural addition to visiting Saaremaa, my main destination. I was hoping to see a snow-clad Kuressaare castle. But very little snow fell on Estonia this winter, especially in January. Not even days of frozen rain could put a dent in my love of this country, however – if anything, it was a special experience that gave layers to it to see Estonia, which I have known as luminous in the summer, in a new way: wrapped in a gleaming silver light.

Muhu (5)

Of course it’s a lot easier to appreciate Baltic winters if you can spend the long dark hours alternating between saunas and pouring buckets of freezing water on yourself, sitting next to young Estonian couples and burly Russian men, with a healthy dose of sel’fwhipping with birch branches. (Sipping on a local IPA in the bubbly pool helps, too).

But it’s not just indulgence. Bathhouses / saunas (albeit lesser known than their Finnish equivalent) are prevalent to Baltic culture. Many rites dating from the pre-Christian era, which then survived openly or privately, are connected with the goddess known as Pirts Māte, the “mother of the bathhouse” (Baltic mythology is rich in “mothers”, especially in Latvia). Bathhouses where a place for births and where newborns spent the first week of their lives with their mothers; hot water and birch branches were left as an offering to the “mother of the bathhouse”; the bodies of the dead rested in the bathhouse before their last rites. It’s not uncommon, in Baltic folklore, for meetings to happen in the bathhouse; at Saule’s wedding (the goddess associated with the sun), the gods met in a bathhouse. (How’s this for cool: historians of religions think the sun tends to be feminine in northern European cultures because the sun was gentle and gave life).
It felt even more special on an island, and Estonians definitely have a particular appreciation for the idea of islandness.

Kuressaare (7)

Kuressaare

The castle in Kuressaare is full of surprises, starting with what you can do in it: get married (not that uncommon), enjoy the sauna (fair enough, this is Estonia) or shoot a 220-year-old cannon named Kotkas (100 euros a shot, people, make it count).

In addition to shooting cannons, you can visit the historical museum housed in the castle; set aside at least 3 or 4 hours for your visit because the museum is that good and that big (although not all panels and labels are available in English). Just like in the rest of the Baltics and in Latvia, especially, recent history in a strong presence in contemporary society. Saaremaa was the last territory to see Russian troops leave in 1994, much later than the rest of the area. The museum also holds fascinating photographic collections, art objects and paintings from as early as the early modern era, an impressive amount of objects and clothes from throughout the 20th century, and Soviet jokes printed on staircase steps.

Kuressaare (10)

Saaremaa, outside Kuressaare

Because the island is large-ish, there is quite a bit to see in Saaremaa: it definitely helps to have a car, but you can also take advantage of local buses (in the summer, mostly) or books a tour with Arti at Active Life and support a local business. (Bus timetables are available at tpilet.ee or better peatus.ee for local buses; ferry timetables can be found on Veeteed.) The forests along the roads, hiding and revealing bits of the sea at every turn, are a song for the soul. You can spot wildlife fairly often (including, or so I’ve heard, a bear who made Saaremaa his home for a couple years before swimming back to the mainland).

One of the best experiences you can have in Saaremaa is visiting its impact crater lake, Kaali crater (Kaali kraater), about 30 minutes from Kuressaare. I’m not sure the photos make this place justice: walking up the sides formed at the time of impact is an awe-inspiring thing. As the lake comes into view, you are perfectly positioned to imagine how terrifying it could have been to watch the sky crash into the earth, about 4,000 years ago. Unsurprisingly, evidence of centuries if not millennia of rites have been found in the area, which was still considered sacred in the Middle Ages. Fortifications were built and sacrifices performed. Some historians also think Kaali crater to be the Thule written about by the Greek geographer Pytheas in the 4th century BC (which later became better known as “Ultima Thule”, in Vergil’s words). Pytheas told how the local population showed him the place “where the sun went to sleep” (others identify Thule with Norway or the Faroe Islands). Estonian folklore also have stories about the time when “Saaremaa burned”.

At any rate, the lake is guaranteed to render you speechless – it certainly did with me, as I looked down onto the full body of water (often not quite as full in the summer), in the sleet. The main crater is also surrounded by a handful of smaller craters in the area.
By the lake, in addition to a primary school, sit a small museum and a restaurant.

clone tag: -936993061495975237

On the northern coast of the island, Panga Cliff looks over the silver and extremely quiet sea (ships give it a wide berth). Under the watchful eye of a Soviet lighthouse, juniper bushes and forests marked by WW2 trenches cover the cliff (be careful in Estonian forests – unexploded WW2 devices are not an uncommon find).

clone tag: 9204830224824055258

If you have more time than me or own transportation, take a couple hours to visit Kiipsaare Lighthouse in the north west of Saaremaa. Built about 90 years ago, the lighthouse was then on dry ground and straight, but it started leaning more and more visibly and today sit in the sea, looking very odd about 50 meters away from the coast.

Where to sleep in Muhu and Saaremaa

This one’s easy. In Kuressaare, you can have your pick of ho(s)tels; I strongly recommend choosing one with a spa, especially if you’re visiting during the colder months, when you are more likely to find a good offer too. I stayed at the Grand Rose Hotel, which has an impressive range of saunas and a spa.

In Muhu, I cannot recommend Vanatoa Farm enough. It’s in a beautiful location hidden in the forest but steps away from Muhu Museum in Koguva as well as from the sea, and the rooms are all decorated with local embroidery. The area is so quiet no doors get locked at night, and the most dangerous creature to walk up to the door are wild hares. The managers (the owner’s a Swedish guy whose wife was Estonian) can also feed you and take you to/from the bus station in Liiva for a few extra bucks.

Muhu (2)

—————————–

 

Prima o poi, doveva succedere: il mare baltico, d’inverno (che a me piace tanto). Questa volta più a nord di Kihnu, a Muhu e Saaremaa (l’isola con la maggiore estensione tra le migliaia in Estonia, e forse l’Ultima Thule).

Muhu (3)

Due isole legate e diversissime. L’identitá isolana è molto forte a Muhu: la gestrice della fattoria in cui ho passato la notte (ve ne parlo sotto) ci vive da anni, ma ha ammesso con un’ombra di disagio che non sará mai considerata “di lí”; non lo è praticamente neanche suo marito, che ha studiato a Tallinn e poi ci è rimasto qualche anno. Per essere davvero “di Muhu”, bisogna esserci nati, cresciuti, e non averla mai abbandonata.
A Saaremaa la storia è un po’ diversa: la più grande delle isole estoni, ha forse l’unico vero centro urbano tra tutte (Kuressaare). A Saaremaa si sentono – sono – isolani, ma con toni molto diversi (prendere ad esempio: la competizione di tiro alla corda che si è tenuta qualche anno fa tendendo una corda dalla costa nord di Saaremaa a quella sud di Hiiumaa, l’isola vicina). (Se ve lo state chiedendo, non ha vinto nessuno: la corda si è spezzata prima). Saaremaa è una meta molto popolare in Estonia per il turismo estivo ma anche invernale, dato che è gremita di spa e saune, ma è sembrato strano a tutti vederci una straniera non russofona.

Da Tallinn si arriva facilmente su entrambe le isole, con un bus diretto (LuxExpress ma anche di altre compagnie locali), che raggiunge Muhu in circa 3 ore e poi Saaremaa un’ora dopo. Il bus sale sul traghetto (per una traversata piuttosto breve, una mezz’ora), quindi non dovete preoccuparvi del trasbordo (ma ricordatevi che dovete scendere dal bus durante il tragitto. Il traghetto è attrezzato con poltrone, bagni, un ristorante e un bar). Da anni si parla di costruire un ponte che colleghi la terraferma e Muhu, ma molti (soprattutto tra gli isolani) non sono d’accordo. Muhu e Saaremaa invece sono collegate da un ponte di terra.

Muhu

Se passate attraverso Muhu senza scendere dal bus o senza allontanarvi dalla strada principale, vi sembrerà che ci sia poco o nulla, e che l’isola abbia un solo centro abitato, Liiva.

Muhu (1).jpg

E a Liiva dovete senz’altro fermarvi, quanto meno per vedere la chiesa gotica di Santa Caterina (Katariina kirik, XIII secolo), aggraziata e bianca con intorno i suoi prati bruciati dal gelo e gli alberi neri, e con le sue pitture policrome con influenze bizantine.

Muhu

Ma Muhu prende vita soprattutto fuori dalla strada principale, dietro alle curve in mezzo ai pini, nei villaggi di pescatori, tra le fattorie con le porte verdi e i mulini storici. Il villaggio di Koguva, nel nord ovest di Muhu, è quello più interessante: è sede di un museo in tre edifici storici, inclusa una scuola (ho già cantato le lodi dei musei locali estoni, e questo non si smentisce). Vi ricordate i colori di Kihnu? A Muhu le gonne sono simili, ma gialle e arancioni; e le tradizioni di ricamo (su scarpe di stoffa e coperte in particolare) sono raffinatissime.

Muhu_embroidery.jpg

Visitare Muhu, a dirla tutta, è venuto in maniera naturale col piano di visitare Saaremaa, che era la mia meta principale. Speravo di vedere il castello sotto la neve: ma di neve questo inverno se ne è vista pochissima, soprattutto all’inizio. Invece neanche giorni di pioggia gelata sono riusciti a farmi disamorare dell’Estonia. Se proprio, vedere questo Paese cosí luminoso d’estate nella cupezza di fine gennaio ha dato spessore al mio interesse per l’Estonia, che è fatta anche di questo: piccole e medie città avvolte in una penombra di perla a volte per mesi.

Muhu (5)

Certo, ad apprezzare l’inverno baltico aiuta passare le ore di buio a traslocarsi dalla sauna (con le coppiette estoni) alla pozza di acqua a 12 gradi (insieme agli omaccioni russi) e viceversa, dandoci giú di rami di betulla all’occasione, e una birretta locale.

La cultura della sauna (meno famosa di quella finlandese) à molto sentita in tutti i Baltici. Molti riti di epoca pre-cristiana, poi durati molto a lungo in maniera aperta o recondita, sono legati alla dea Pirts Māte, la “madre della sauna” (la mitologia baltica, specialmente lettone, ha tutta una serie di “madri”). Nelle saune si nasceva, e madre e neonato ci passavano la settimana successiva; nelle saune si lasciava acqua calda e rami di betulla perché la “madre della sauna” potesse usarli; nelle saune le salme attendevano il rito funebre; nelle saune, in generale, nelle storie baltiche, si radunano gli dei, come per il matrimonio di Saule, la dea associata al sole (sentite questa chicca: gli storici della religione ritengono che spesso nelle culture del nord il sole sia una divinità femminile perché “gentile” e datrice di vita).
A me è sembrata un’esperienza ancora piú speciale su un’isola – e al concetto di “essere isola” (islandness) gli Estoni sono molto legati.

Kuressaare (7)

Kuressaare

Il castello di Kuressaare è pieno di sorprese, a partire dal fatto che ci si può sposare dentro (e va bene, è abbastanza comune), che ci si può fare la sauna dentro (già più strano, ma siamo comunque in Estonia), e che potete sparare con un cannone di nome Kotkas (100 euro a colpo eh, quindi fatelo valere).

Oltre a sparare con cannoni duecentenari, potete visitare il museo storico della città, all’interno del castello – ma mettete in conto di passarci almeno 3 o 4 ore, perché è enorme e bellissimo, anche se purtroppo non tutto disponibile in inglese. Come anche in Lituania e soprattutto in Lettonia, c’è un senso fortissimo della storia recente del Paese e delle ferite lasciate da occupazioni multiple in sequenza. A Saaremaa, peraltro, l’occupazione militare sovietica è terminata a tutti gli effetti soltanto nel 1994, un bel pezzo dopo la maggior parte dei Baltici. Dentro al museo trovate collezioni fotografiche intensissime, oggetti d’arte e affreschi della prima età moderna, un numero impressionante di abiti e oggetti da tutta la storia del XX secolo, e scherzi sovietici stampati sugli scalini.

Kuressaare (10)

Saaremaa, fuori da Kuressaare

Date le dimensioni dell’isola, c’è parecchio da esplorare a Saaremaa; avere un’auto aiuta ma in alternativa potete affidarvi ai bus pubblici (in estate) o organizzare un tour con Arti (tutto l’anno) e supportare il suo piccolo business locale, Active Life. (Per i bus potete controllare gli orari dei bus su tpilet.ee o meglio, per brevi distanze, su peatus.ee; per gli orari dei traghetti, Veeteed.) Le foreste di Saaremaa, che a ogni curva rivelano o nascondono un pezzo di mare, riempiono il cuore e sono piene di animali selvatici (pure un orso che, per un paio d’anni, ha fatto villeggiatura sull’isola e poi deve essere tornato a nuoto sulla terraferma).

Una delle esperienze più speciali che si possono fare a Saaremaa è senz’altro visitare il suo lago meteoritico, il cratere di Kaali (Kaali kraater), a una mezz’oretta di distanza da Kuressaare. Dalle foto non sembrerà magari un granché, ma di persona vi garantisco che è impressionante – arrampicandovi sulle alte sponde create durante l’impatto del meteorite, il lago appare all’improvviso e siete nella posizione perfetta per immaginare che razza di esperienza deve essere stata vedere cadere un pezzo di cielo in terra, circa 4000 anni fa. E infatti non a caso ci sono tracce che suggeriscono che per moltissimo tempo, in seguito, il cratere sia stato sito di riti, e che fosse ancora considerato sacro in epoca mediavale; sopravvivono tracce di sacrifici e pezzi di fortificazioni nell’area. Alcuni storici pensano anche la Thule di cui parla Pitea, geografo greco del IV secolo a.C. (poi diventata piú famosa nella formula di Virgilio, “Ultima Thule”) sia proprio qui: Pitea riporta che la popolazione locale gli mostrò “il posto dove il sole va a dormire”. (Altri identificano Thule con la Norvegia o le isole Faroe). Il folklore del nord dell’Estonia conserva anche canzoni che raccontano di quando l’isola di Saaremaa “prese fuoco”.

Ad ogni modo è una cosa impressionante, affascinante da vedere nel silenzio assoluto sotto il nevischio, e con le acque a pieno regime (in estate a volte il lago si svuota quasi del tutto). Il cratere principale è circondato da una decina di crateri piú piccoli, sparsi nella zona.
Nei pressi del lago, oltre alla scuola elementare proprio a fianco (che più vicina non si può), trovate un mini museo e un ristorante.

clone tag: -936993061495975237

Sulla costa nord dell’isola, invece, la scogliera di Panga si stende di fronte a un pezzo di mare argenteo e silenziosissimo (le navi la prendono alla larga, dato che il fondale è basso). La scogliera è coperta di cespuglio di ginepro e di boschi ancora solcati dalle trincee della Seconda Guerra Mondiale (in tutti i boschi estoni bisogna stare all’occhio fuori dai sentieri, si trovano ancora ordigni inesplosi con una certa frequenza), ed è dominata da un faro sovietico.

clone tag: 9204830224824055258

Per chi ha più tempo, una meta ulteriore si trova nel nord ovest dell’isola, in un parco naturale: si tratta del faro di Kiipsaare, costruito circa 90 anni fa e nei decenni diventato sempre più storto e sempre più lontano dalla costa (oggi si trova a 50 metri dal litorale). Io non ci sono stata ma è sulla mia lista!

Dove dormire

Questa è facile. A Kuressaare, ci sono moltissimi hotel e ostelli tra cui scegliere; io vi consiglio di prenotarne uno con spa e sauna, soprattutto se andate in inverno, quando ci sono spesso offerte. Il Grand Rose Hotel, dove sono stata io, ha un’ottima sauna / spa.

A Muhu, senza alcun dubbio alla fattoria Vanatoa, nascosta nei boschi, proprio accanto al museo dell’isola nel villaggio di Koguva, a due passi dall’acqua. Decorato con ricami tradizionali, e cosí tranquillo che nessuna porta viene chiusa a chiave; d’altronde girano solo lepri e gatti nei cortili. I gestori (il proprietario è uno svedese che era sposato a un’Estone) vi possono nutrire e portare dalla / alla stazione dei bus per un extra.

Muhu (2)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s